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kenyatta: embouteillage: What was going on in 1984 that made...

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kenyatta:

embouteillage:

What was going on in 1984 that made so many women give up on computer science? This week’s Planet Money tries to unravel the mystery.

fav interesting cultural bit:

There’s no clear, single answer.

But here’s a good starting place: The share of women in computer science started falling at roughly the same moment when personal computers started showing up in U.S. homes in significant numbers.

These early personal computers weren’t much more than toys. You could play pong or simple shooting games, maybe do some word processing. And these toys were marketed almost entirely to men and boys.

This idea that computers are for boys became a narrative. It became the story we told ourselves about the computing revolution. It helped define who geeks were, and it created techie culture.

Movies like Weird Science, Revenge of the Nerds and War Games all came out in the ’80s. And the plot summaries are almost interchangeable: awkward geek boy genius uses tech savvy to triumph over adversity and win the girl.

This. (Although I feel like the 2000’s deepening of the divide had something to do with the deification of tech billionaires and the promise that you could get insanely rich almost immediately.)

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vmdebootstrap images for ARMMP on BBB

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After patches from Petter to add foreign architecture support and picking up some scripting from freedombox, I’ve just built a Debian unstable image using the ARMMP kernel on Beaglebone-black.

A few changes to vmdebootstrap will need to go into the next version (0.3), including an example customise script to setup the u-boot support. With the changes, the command would be:

sudo ./vmdebootstrap --owner `whoami` --verbose --size 2G --mirror http://mirror.bytemark.co.uk/debian --log beaglebone-black.log --log-level debug --arch armhf --foreign /usr/bin/qemu-arm-static --no-extlinux --no-kernel --package u-boot --package linux-image-armmp --distribution sid --enable-dhcp --configure-apt --serial-console-command '/sbin/getty -L ttyO0 115200 vt100' --customize examples/beagleboneblack-customise.sh --bootsize 50m --boottype vfat --image bbb.img

Some of those commands are new but there are a few important elements:

  • use of –arch and –foreign to provide the emulation needed to run the debootstrap second stage.
  • drop extlinux and install u-boot as a package.
  • linux-image-armmp kernel
  • new command to configure an apt source
  • serial-console-command as the BBB doesn’t use the default /dev/ttyS0
  • choice of sid to get the latest ARMMP and u-boot versions
  • customize command – this is a script which does two things:
    • copies the dtbs into the boot partition
    • copies the u-boot files and creates a u-boot environment to use those files.
  • use of a boot partition – note that it needs to be large enough to include the ARMMP kernel and a backup of the same files.

With this in place, a simple dd to an SD card and the BBB boots directly into Debian ARMMP.

The examples are now in my branch and include an initial cubieboard script which is unfinished.

The current image is available for download. (222Mb).

I hope to upload the new vmdebootstrap soon – let me know if you do try the version in the branch.

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Sometimes I’m like

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Reposted from Pinterest.

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[$] The future of the realtime patch set

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The page you have tried to view (The future of the realtime patch set) is currently available to LWN subscribers only. Reader subscriptions are a necessary way to fund the continued existence of LWN and the quality of its content.

If you are already an LWN.net subscriber, please log in with the form below to read this content.

Please consider subscribing to LWN. An LWN subscription provides numerous benefits, including access to restricted content and the warm feeling of knowing that you are helping to keep LWN alive.

(Alternatively, this item will become freely available on October 30, 2014)

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jepler
2 days ago
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just in the year that linuxcnc is starting to lean more heavily on PREEMPT-RT. but we operate on no money too, so it's not like we can send him the briefcase of money he deserves
Earth, Sol system, Western spiral arm
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jepler
2 days ago
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wait is that a thing, or does the satire extend to the purported page title?
Earth, Sol system, Western spiral arm
kazriko
2 days ago
Obama has argued for creating such a position.
jepler
2 days ago
I haven't been reading the news this week .. doh
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1 public comment
sfrazer
2 days ago
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Of course this wouldn't even be a suggestion if we could get a Surgeon General appointed.
Chicago

Avoiding systemd isn't hard

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Don't listen to trolls. They lie.
Debian was and continues to be about choice. Previously, you could configure Debian to use other init systems, and you can continue to do so in the future.
In fact, with wheezy, sysvinit was essential. In the words of trolls, Debian "forced" you to install SysV init!
With jessie, it will become easier to choose the init system, because neither init system is essential now. Instead, there is an essential meta-package "init", which requires you to install one of systemd-sysv | sysvinit-core | upstart. In other words, you have more choice than ever before.
Again: don't listen to trolls.
However, notice that there are some programs such as login managers (e.g. gdm3) which have an upstream dependency on systemd. gdm3 links against libsystemd0 and depends on libpam-systemd; and the latter depends on systemd-sysv | systemd-shim so it is in fact a software such as GNOME that is pulling systemd onto your computer.
IMHO you should give systemd a try. There are some broken (SysV-) init scripts that cause problems with systemd; but many of these cases have now been fixed - not in systemd, but in the broken init script.
However, here is a clean way to prevent systemd from being installed when you upgrade to jessie. (No need to "fork" Debian for this, which just demonstrates how uninformed some trolls are ... - apart from Debian being very open to custom debian distributions, which can easily be made without "forking".)
As you should know, apt allows version pinning. This is the proper way to prevent a package from being installed. All you need to do is create a file named e.g. /etc/apt/preferences.d/no-systemd with the contents:
Package: systemd-sysv
Pin: release o=Debian
Pin-Priority: -1
from the documentation, a priority less than 0 disallows the package from being installed. systemd-sysv is the package that would enable systemd as your default init (/sbin/init).
This change will make it much harder for aptitude to solve dependencies. A good way to help it to solve the dependencies is to install the systemd-shim package explicitly first:
aptitude install systemd-shim
After this, I could upgrade a Debian system from wheezy to jessie without being "forced" to use systemd...
As you can see, the trolls are totally blaming the wrong people, for the wrong reasons... and in fact, the trolls make up false claims (as a fact, systemd-shim was updated on Oct 14). Stop listening to trolls, please.
If you find a bug - a package that needlessly depends on systemd, or a good way to remove some dependency e.g. via dynamic linking, please contribute a patch upstream and file a bug. Solve problems at the package/bug level, instead of wasting time doing hate speeches.
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jepler
2 days ago
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"Solve problems at the package/bug level, instead of wasting time doing hate speeches."
Earth, Sol system, Western spiral arm
skorgu
1 day ago
"In fact, I could also do an aptitude remove systemd systemd-shim. But that would have required the uninstallation of GNOME, gdm3 and network-manager" Feature not bug. Fuck Gnome.
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