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surprising PC demographics from the 5e backgrounds

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Let's assume that all PC backgrounds and traits are assigned randomly (there are 13 backgrounds so about 7.5% of PCs have each background).

conan book returnOut of every 1000 Player Characters:
15 are fire eaters. (d10 entertainer routines, of which you get 1d3) Makes sense that this number is so high, since every bad fantasy movie has at least one fire eater per crowd scene. Fire eating is apparently riveting entertainment in Fantasy Europe.
10 are librarians. (d8 sage specialty)
10 are blackmailers. (d8 criminal specialty) Blackmailers are not the most dashing of outlaws, and it's hard to reconcile them with heroic fantasy. Nevertheless, I'm looking forward to many D&D adventures inspired by the life of Charles Augustus Howell..
A whopping 19 are raised by wolves. (d8 outlander personality trait, of which you get two)
4 are guild blacksmiths. (d20 guild business) This might sound naiive, but I absurdly thought that a smith background would be MORE common among adventurers than a raised-by-wolves background. Obviously I was off by a factor of 5. That's why "Smith" is such a rare last name and "Wolfson" is so common.

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jepler
1 day ago
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"Out of every 1000 player characters, a whopping 19 are raised by wolves"
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Poettering: Revisiting how we put together Linux systems

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[Posted September 1, 2014 by corbet]

Poettering: Revisiting how we put together Linux systems

[Distributions] Posted Sep 1, 2014 11:58 UTC (Mon) by corbet

Lennart Poettering has posted a lengthy writeup of a plan put together by the "systemd cabal" (his words) to rework Linux software distribution. It is based heavily on namespaces and Btrfs snapshots. "Now, with the name-spacing concepts we introduced above, we can actually relatively freely mix and match apps and OSes, or develop against specific frameworks in specific versions on any operating system. It doesn't matter if you booted your ArchLinux instance, or your Fedora one, you can execute both LibreOffice and Firefox just fine, because at execution time they get matched up with the right runtime, and all of them are available from all the operating systems you installed. You get the precise runtime that the upstream vendor of Firefox/LibreOffice did their testing with. It doesn't matter anymore which distribution you run, and which distribution the vendor prefers."

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jepler
1 day ago
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.. so long as you run systemd as pid 1, one assumes.
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Links August 2014

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Matt Palmer wrote a good overview of DNSSEC [1].

Sociological Images has an interesting article making the case for phasing out the US $0.01 coin [2]. The Australian $0.01 and $0.02 coins were worth much more when they were phased out.

Multiplicity is a board game that’s designed to address some of the failings of SimCity type games [3]. I haven’t played it yet but the page describing it is interesting.

Carlos Buento’s article about the Mirrortocracy has some interesting insights into the flawed hiring culture of Silicon Valley [4].

Adam Bryant wrote an interesting article for NY Times about Google’s experiments with big data and hiring [5]. Among other things it seems that grades and test results have no correlation with job performance.

Jennifer Chesters from the University of Canberra wrote an insightful article about the results of Australian private schools [6]. Her research indicates that kids who go to private schools are more likely to complete year 12 and university but they don’t end up earning more.

Kiwix is an offline Wikipedia reader for Android, needs 9.5G of storage space for the database [7].

Melanie Poole wrote an informative article for Mamamia about the evil World Congress of Families and their connections to the Australian government [8].

The BBC has a great interactive web site about how big space is [9].

The Raspberry Pi Spy has an interesting article about automating Minecraft with Python [10].

Wired has an interesting article about the Bittorrent Sync platform for distributing encrypted data [11]. It’s apparently like Dropbox but encrypted and decentralised. Also it supports applications on top of it which can offer social networking functions among other things.

ABC news has an interesting article about the failure to diagnose girls with Autism [12].

The AbbottsLies.com.au site catalogs the lies of Tony Abbott [13]. There’s a lot of work in keeping up with that.

Racialicious.com has an interesting article about “Moff’s Law” about discussion of media in which someone says “why do you have to analyze it” [14].

Paul Rosenberg wrote an insightful article about conservative racism in the US, it’s a must-read [15].

Salon has an interesting and amusing article about a photography project where 100 people were tased by their loved ones [16]. Watch the videos.

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jepler
1 day ago
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just in case you need a 5-minute video about why the US penny should be phased out...
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SPOOOOON!

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The Tick is a big, blue, nigh-invulnerable, possibly brain-damaged super-hero created by Ben Edlund in 1986. He has appeared in comic books (1988), animated TV (1994), and live action TV (2001). According to The Wrap, Patrick Warburton has worked out a deal with Sony to create a new Tick pilot for Amazon.
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jepler
1 day ago
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attn mdc
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emdeesee
7 hours ago
I guess it's too soon to cancel Prime then.
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Utopian for Beginners.

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Utopian for Beginners.

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jepler
1 day ago
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that was interesting
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graydon
2 days ago
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"This isn’t exactly something you discuss on a first or second date"

Oh god read it now.
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1 public comment
sarcozona
15 days ago
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Unexpected and wonderful

apt-offline 1.4

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apt-offline 1.4 has been released [1]. This is a minor bug fix release. In fact, one feature, offline bug reports (--bug-reports),  has been dropped for now.

The Debian BTS interface seems to have changed over time and the older debianbts.py module (that used the CGI interface) does not seem to work anymore. The current debbugs.py module seems to have switched to the SOAP interface.

There are a lot of changes going on personally, I just haven't had the time to spend. If anyone would like to help, please reach out to me. We need to use the new debbugs.py module. And it should be cross-platform.

Also, thanks to Hans-Christoph Steiner for providing the bash completion script.

[1] https://alioth.debian.org/projects/apt-offline/

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jepler
2 days ago
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I had no idea this was still being developed. about 6-8 years ago we had some people who I know would have benefitted from this with linuxcnc (it's probably sensible to not connect your cnc control to the internet, but you still want software updates). I haven't heard that so much lately, I guess people are more at home treating their linuxcnc machines as either never-updated black boxes or as general purpose computers. I'm not sure which is the case though.
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copyninja
15 hours ago
Its not been active, recently. I know the developer and met him personally and he is bit of busy guy.
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