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Rivals and Legal Action Cast Shadows Over Windows on Arm Market

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Qualcomm faces potential disruption to its Windows on Arm laptops due to a legal battle with Arm, while MediaTek prepares to enter the market. Qualcomm's exclusivity deal with Microsoft for Copilot+ PCs, based on its Snapdragon SoCs, is set to expire this year.

MediaTek plans to launch its own Windows on Arm chip in late 2024, though it's unclear if it has Microsoft's approval. The legal dispute stems from Qualcomm's acquisition of Nuvia, with Arm claiming Nuvia's licenses are non-transferable without permission. Arm terminated the licenses, requiring Qualcomm to stop using processor designs developed under those agreements. Arm asserts current Copilot+ SoCs descend from Nuvia's chips, potentially subjecting them to an injunction if Arm prevails in court. Qualcomm maintains its existing Arm license rights cover its custom CPUs. Both companies declined to comment on the ongoing legal matter.
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jepler
14 hours ago
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don't you love it when you license key technology from a litigious company???
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jepler
14 hours ago
not that I shed too many tears when bda stuff happens to qualcomm mind
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Between sharks and shocks: Answering Trump’s unanswered question - The Washington Post

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“So we have a country that's in trouble,” Donald Trump began.

A lot of Trump’s stories begin similarly, so those in the audience at his Las Vegas rally this weekend would be forgiven for not predicting the multiple tangents the former president was about to take. Even when his next sentence narrowed it down — “We’re going to end the mandate on electric one day” — no one could have guessed what the next 2½ minutes would bring.

Sharks. MIT. Electrocution. And, of course, a guy who called Trump “sir.”

It is possible that the sheer weirdness of this story has already led to your seeing it. Transcripts of Trump's 500-plus-word riff spread over social media, as people tried to parse it like the final exam of a fifth-grade English class. If you didn't see it, allow me to offer an abridged version.

The story began with Trump describing a conversation with a boat manufacturer in South Carolina. (This was the person who purportedly referred to him as “sir.”) Trump offered more familiarity with boats than his audience — again, in the desert city of Las Vegas — might have possessed, with casual references to vessel lengths and motor manufacturers. The point, though, was that even this estimable industry had been afflicted by calls to reduce fossil fuel consumption.

According to Trump’s telling, the manufacturer was being asked to make only electric boats but that such boats 1) were too heavy to float, 2) had to be slowly driven out to sea, which took hours and 3) then had so little charge left that you could only be out for 10 minutes. The first point is obviously false, given that there are lots of floating electric vessels — including in the U.S. Navy — so there’s no reason to assume that the rest would be true, either.

Then came Trump's question.

“So I said, ‘Let me ask you a question,’” Trump explained. “And he said, ‘Nobody ever asks this question,’ and it must because of MIT, my relationship to MIT. Very smart.”

Trump’s relationship to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is that he had an uncle who taught there. And as everyone knows, you can tell a lot about a person’s capabilities from what their parents’ siblings do for a living. But back to the question.

“I say, ‘What would happen if the boat sank from its weight and you’re in the boat, and you have this tremendously powerful battery, and the battery’s now underwater, and there’s a shark that’s approximately 10 yards over there?’” Trump said.

Then Trump went on a tangent about sharks and shark attacks. In the abstract, this was just odd, given that — just as a reminder! — this was Trump trying to convince a lot of Nevadans to vote for him for president. But his aversion to sharks is well-established — and, in fact, overlaps with his recent criminal conviction in Manhattan.

The criminal trial in New York centered on Stormy Daniels, the adult-film actress who claimed to have had a sexual encounter with Trump in 2006 — he denies they had sex — and the hush money payment made to her by Trump’s attorney before the 2016 election. In a 2011 interview with In Touch Weekly that was published after the details of the alleged encounter between Trump and Daniels were made public in 2018, she recounted his disdain for sharks. Daniels explained that one of their encounters overlapped with the Discovery Channel’s “Shark Week” programming. As the two sat in Trump’s hotel room, he volunteered how much he hated sharks and wished they all would die. That his central concern related to a sinking boat would be sharks certainly bolsters the idea that Daniels was telling the truth.

In this case, that concern was offered as a counterpoint to the threat from the sinking vessel.

“Do I get electrocuted if the boat is sinking, water goes over the battery, the boat is sinking?” Trump says he asked the man. “Do I stay on top of the boat and get electrocuted, or do I jump over by the shark and not get electrocuted?”

The boat manufacturer, he said, didn't know the answer. But lots of other people do: The risk of electrocution is extremely low, so stay on the boat.

There are lots of ways to think about this. The first, and perhaps most obvious, is that people who actually make electric boats (unlike this possibly apocryphal guy from South Carolina) understand that electricity and water don’t mix that well and, as such, build their vessels to minimize that risk.

When Trump offered a similar question of shocks vs. sharks a few months ago, the site Heatmap spoke with boat manufacturers who “said they meet a waterproofing standard that is either at, or just below, what is required for a submarine.” Arc Boat Company has an explanation about using electricity in a boat on its website, noting that its “battery packs are completely watertight.”

“We use leak detection sensors inside of the packs — something you don’t typically see in electric cars — so that in the unlikely event that water is present, we’ll know about it immediately and can issue an appropriate warning,” the site explains. Often, companies selling products to the general public consider the risk that their products might kill people before bringing those products to market.

It is also not the case that an electrical charge in the water spreads everywhere at the same strength indefinitely. When lightning strikes the ocean, it is not the case that every fish dies or that every person swimming on every coast is fried. The fish survive in part because the charge is primarily at the surface, so the analogy here isn't perfect. But being at a distance from the charge matters regardless of the source of the charge.

I emailed the Batten College of Engineering and Technology at Old Dominion University to get the input of experts on the question of the deadly boat battery. Students from the college study electric propulsion and placed third in an electric boat competition last summer.

A statement provided by the university to The Washington Post, though, was a little light on physics in favor of pop culture: Remember what happened in the movie “Titanic?”

“Near the movie’s end, before the remainder of the lights go out, they show sailors flipping off power switches until the water reaches an open switch, creating a short circuit that electrocutes the sailor near the switch,” the statement read. “The movie shows many other cases of short circuits that do not electrocute people. If a person floating in water is not too close to the power source, [he] is unlikely to be electrocuted, and the power source will stop serving as a battery once it is fried.”

Director James Cameron's reputation for accuracy apparently withstands the scrutiny of actual engineers.

But you get the point. If Trump is sitting near that battery on the sinking ship and isn't confident that the protections installed by the boat manufacturer will hold, he could simply swim away from the battery in the opposite direction of the shark, thereby avoiding both fates. At least for a moment.

Trump’s solution, by the way, was to be electrocuted, thus avoiding being gobbled up by the shark. But unfortunately for him and his fears, he probably wouldn’t be electrocuted and would, instead, be eaten.

With that, you have one more bit of information that can inform your presidential vote this November, as Trump intended.

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jepler
1 day ago
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There is so much in here, but I'll go with the journalist's remark:

> Often, companies selling products to the general public consider the risk that their products might kill people before bringing those products to market
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hannahdraper
1 day ago
Unless you're Tesla!
acdha
1 day ago
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Washington, DC
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NEW GUIDE: Optical Sensor Drum Track Sequencer

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LEGO conveyor belts turning with yellow and white minifigure heads

John Park’s new Learn Guide is here!

Build a physical drum sequencer so you can program beats right here in the real world! Four tracks of drums (say kick, snare, clap, cowbell, but it’s your choice) and 32 steps for two four-bar patterns can trigger your favorite drum synthesizer or sample player.

Four optical reflection sensors detect LEGO minifigure heads as they roll on by, all driven by a Feather RP2040 with Motor FeatherWing running CircuitPython.

 

Read more at Optical Sensor Drum Track Sequencer

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jepler
7 days ago
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look at all those severed heads
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Running SWEET16, Steve Wozniak’s “The Dream Machine” from WozMon

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The Tech with Dave blog looks into some Apple programming history:

The story goes that Steve Wozniak was running out of space in Apple Integer BASIC, and out of necessity, determination, and will power, developed SWEET16 to do 16-bit operations in a more compact fashion.

There is already a great article on SWEET16, the interpretive processing 16-bit supplement to 6502 machine language programs, over at 6502.org.  The article tells the history, instructs how to port, and provides a tutorial on how to use it.  (And see article on Wikipedia, and Steve Wozniak’s 1977 article in Byte magazine).

Check out how Dave gets SWEET16 up and running on a defined 6502 setup in the post here.

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jepler
9 days ago
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project idea: FPGA that emulates 6502 but adds native SWEET16 instructions....
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Turbocase Generates A PCB Shell For You

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An example of the case generated for a simple PCB, being shown in the OpenSCAD viewer

Our PCBs greatly benefit from cases – what’s with all the pins that can be accidentally shorted, connectors that stick out of the outline, and cables pulling the board into different directions. Designing a case for your PCB might feel like a fair bit of effort – but it likely isn’t, thanks to projects like turbocase from [Martijn Braam].

This script generates simple and elegant OpenSCAD cases for your KiCad PCBs – you only need to draw a few extra lines in the PCB Editor, that’s it. It makes connector openings, too – add a “Height” property to your connector footprints to have them be handled automatically. Oh, and there’s a few quality-of-life features – if your project has mounting holes, the script will add threaded-insert-friendly standoffs to the case; yet another argument for adding mounting holes to your boards, in case you needed more.

Installing the script is a single line, running it is merely another, and that will cover an overwhelming majority of boards out there; the code is all open too, of course. Want some more customization? Here’s some general project enclosure tutorials for OpenSCAD, and a KiCad-friendly StepUp tutorial. Oh, and of course, there’s many more ways to enclose PCBs – our own [Bob Baddeley] has written a guide to project enclosures that you are bound to learn new things from.

We thank [adistuder] for sharing this with us!

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jepler
9 days ago
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Need to remember this for next time
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Proposed Zero-Carbon Cement Solution Called 'Absolute Miracle'

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"Concrete and steel production are major sources of CO2 emissions," writes New Atlas, "but a new solution from Cambridge could recycle both at the same time." Throwing old concrete into steel-processing furnaces not only purifies iron but produces "reactivated cement" as a byproduct. If done using renewable energy, the process could make for completely carbon-zero cement.

Concrete is the world's most used building material, and making it is a particularly dirty business — concrete production alone is responsible for about 8% of total global CO2 emissions. Unfortunately it's not easy to recycle back into a form that can be used to make new concrete structures... For the new study, Cambridge researchers investigated how waste concrete could be converted back into clinker, the dry component of cement, ready to be used again. "I had a vague idea from previous work that if it were possible to crush old concrete, taking out the sand and stones, heating the cement would remove the water, and then it would form clinker again," said Dr. Cyrille Dunant, first author of the study...

An electric arc furnace needs a "flux" material, usually lime, to purify the steel. This molten rocky substance captures the impurities, then bubbles to the surface and forms a protective layer that prevents the new pure steel from becoming exposed to air. At the end of the process, the used flux is discarded as a waste material. So for the Cambridge method, the lime flux was swapped out for the recycled cement paste. And sure enough, not only was it able to purify the steel just fine, but if the leftover slag is cooled quickly in air, it becomes new Portland cement.

The resulting concrete has similar performance to the original stuff. Importantly, the team says this technique doesn't add major costs to either concrete or steel production, and significantly reduces CO2 emissions compared to the usual methods of making both. If the electric arc furnace was powered by renewable sources, it could essentially make for zero-emission cement.

"The first industrial-scale trials are underway this month," the article adds. "Producing zero emissions cement is an absolute miracle, but we've also got to reduce the amount of cement and concrete we use," said Professor Julian Allwood, who led the research.

And the professor has also recorded a thoughtful video visualizing the process — and explaining the significance of their breakthrough.
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jepler
18 days ago
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I'm so tired of relative miracles
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